THE ULTIMATE OUTSIDER: A TRIBUTE TO JEAN-LUC GODARD


The Roxie pays tribute to the great Jean-Luc Godard with an ongoing series of some of his greatest films, beginning with four of his first assaults on traditional cinema.

See either for $14 or get a pass to see all four for $44 at the box office.


Breathless (35MM)

There was before Breathless, and there was after Breathless. Jean-Luc Godard burst onto the film scene in 1960 with this jazzy, free-form, and sexy homage to the American film genres that inspired him as a writer for Cahiers du cinéma. With its lack of polish, surplus of attitude, anything-goes crime narrative, and effervescent young stars Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg, Breathless helped launch the French New Wave and ensured that cinema would never be the same. 1960. France. English and French with English subtitles. 35mm. 90 minutes

Breathless plays October 8, 9, 11 & 12. Tickets available here. Get a pass to see all four for $44 at the box office.


Band of Outsiders

Title: BANDE A PART ¥ Pers: BRIALY, JEAN-CLAUDE / KARINA, ANNA / BRASSEUR, CLAUDE ¥ Year: 1964 ¥ Dir: GODARD, JEAN-LUC ¥ Ref: BAN005AC ¥ Credit: [ ANOUCHKA/ORSAY / THE KOBAL COLLECTION ]

One of Godard’s most beloved films, based on Dolores Hitchens’ novel Fools’ Gold. Godard’s pitch? “Alice in Wonderland meets Franz Kafka.” But that doesn’t quite account for the magical spell that the film casts, which has a lot to do with the youth and grace of its three young stars Anna Karina, Sami Frey and Claude Brasseur; with Godard’s freedom of invention, which allows him to move from reverie to the antic to the unexpected celebration of sheer movement that is the now-canonical Madison scene; and, in Manny Farber’s words, “the inclement charm Godard gets from drizzly weather.” 1964. France. English and French with English subtitles. DCP. 95 min.

Band of Outsiders plays October 21 & 22. Tickets available here. Get a pass to see all four for $44 at the box office.


Masculin Féminin

Godard’s freewheeling portrait of “the children of Marx and Coca-Cola”—a generation caught between capitalist pleasures and socialist ideals—stars Léaud as a young, self-styled radical-intellectual as he becomes involved in an on-again, off-again relationship with an aspiring yé-yé girl (Chantal Goya). The director depicts Paris as both a modern playland of arcades, discotheques, and pop music, and a simmering hotbed of political unrest and random acts of violence. Sporting short hair, wearing his traditional suit, and chain-smoking cigarettes, Jean-Pierre Léaud channels the turbulent atmosphere of the time as he delivers an impassioned monologue in a record-your-own-voice booth, whistles Bach in a café, and discusses the myriad synonyms for “buttocks” in bed. 1966. France. French with English subtitles DCP. 103 minutes

Masculin Féminin plays November 2 & 6. Tickets available here. Get a pass to see all four for $44 at the box office.


Alphaville

“Humble secret agent” Lemmy Caution (Eddie Constantine) arrives from the Outlands in Alphaville, the becalmed territory ruled by the computer Alpha 60 where “No one has ever lived in the past, no one will ever live in the future, the present is the form of all life.” When Caution meets Natacha Von Braun (Anna Karina), the forbidden, illogical power of love opens the path to liberation. All of science fiction is a commentary on the present by way of an imagined future; Godard visually abstracted the Paris of 1964 by way of 1940s Hollywood in order to foreground its smoothly engineered consumer-driven impersonality. 1965. France. French with English subtitles. Restored DCP. 99 minutes.

Alphaville plays November 12 & 14. Tickets available here. Get a pass to see all four for $44 at the box office.