Tiny Double Feature: SHADOWS + A BUCKET OF BLOOD

We’ve got two films from two maverick American filmmakers in just two and a half hours!

A concentrated blast of late ’50s beat culture from very different perspectives.

Shadows (1959)

SHADOWS isn’t America’s first indie feature film, but it may be its first mature one — the first to put everything on the line for its uncompromising modern approach to style and subject matter.
As he follows the lives of three Manhattanite siblings (with a breakout performance by Lelia Goldoni), Cassavetes gives each actor room to shape their character like a bandleader calling out solos. The filmmaker would refine this style in later pictures, but one doesn’t look to SHADOWS for refinement; it’s as raw, direct and original as the day it first hit the screen. . . Using the rough-hewn vérité style which redefined filmmaking, SHADOWS’ off-the-cuff narrative and staccato editing share an affinity with bop jazz. – American Genre Film Archive

Directed by John Cassavetes. USA. 1959. 81 min. DCP.

Plays with:

A Bucket of Blood (1959)

Nerdy Walter Paisley (Dick Miller), a maladroit busboy at a beatnik café who doesn’t fit in with the cool scene around him, attempts to woo his beautiful co-worker, Carla (Barboura Morris), by making a bust of her. When his klutziness results in the death of his landlady’s cat, he panics and hides its body under a layer of plaster. But when Carla and her friends enthuse over the resulting artwork, Walter decides to create some bigger and more elaborate pieces using the same artistic process.

Dir. Roger Corman. USA. 1959. 59 min. Blu-ray.


NOTE FILMS START RIGHT AT THE LISTED SHOWTIME. THERE WILL BE A TEN-MINUTE INTERMISSION BETWEEN THE FILMS.

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Tiny Double Feature: SHADOWS + A BUCKET OF BLOOD: Upcoming Showtimes