THE FUTURE WAS HERE: SCI-FI IN ANIME

SHOWTIMES / BUY TICKETS
First show: September 16

ENCORE SCREENINGS ADDED!

The Future Was Here: Sci-Fi in Anime is a collection of 6 prime examples of anime Sci-Fi films that invite us to explore deep philosophical topics (nature of consciousness, artificial intelligence, war..) in beautifully crafted futuristic worlds only limited by the artist’s imagination. All the films are big screen must-sees and will be presented in Japanese with English subtitles.

Want to see all SIX? Buy a festival pass for $60 to have access to all 6 films. Click here to buy your The Future was here Pass (if you get one, your pass will be held at the box office.) PASSES ARE SOLD OUT.

Friday, September 16, 2016
AKIRA (1988) – 9:00pm AT RUSH! (a rush line will be available for unclaimed seats, on a first-come-first-serve basis) Shows added on Tuesday, 9/20 and Thursday, 9/29!

Saturday, September 17, 2016
Paprika (2006) – 7:00pm (35mm) AT RUSH! (a rush line will be available for unclaimed seats, on a first-come-first-serve basis) Show added on Thursday, 9/22
Ghost in the Shell (1995) -9:00pm AT RUSH! (a rush line will be available for unclaimed seats, on a first-come-first-serve basis) Show added on Monday, 9/19

Sunday, September 18, 2016
Robot Carnival (1987) – 3:30pm
Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984) 5:30pm AT RUSH! (a rush line will be available for unclaimed seats, on a first-come-first-serve basis) Show added on Wednesday, 9/28
Metropolis (2001) – 8:00pm (35mm)

ENCORE SCREENINGS

Monday, September 19, 2016
Ghost in the Shell (1995) -9:15pm

Tuesday, September 20, 2016
AKIRA (1988) – 7:00pm AT RUSH! (a rush line will be available for unclaimed seats, on a first-come-first-serve basis)

Thursday, September 22, 2016
Paprika (2006) – 9:30pm (35mm)

Wednesday, September 28, 2016
Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984) – 9:15pm

Thursday, September 29, 2016
AKIRA (1988) – 9:30pm

 

FREE OR DISCOUNTED FOR ROXIE MEMBERS.

The Future Was Here: Sci-Fi in Anime Facebook event


Friday, September 16, 2016

AKIRA (1988) – 9:00pm (at Rush) / Show added Tue. 9/20 @7pm (at rush) and Thursday, 9/29 @9:30pm

akira

In 1988, the landmark Anime film AKIRA, by director Katsuhiro Otomo, defined the cutting edge of Anime around the world. By today’s standards, Akira remains the pinnacle of cel animation and retains the explosive impact of its highly detailed animation and its intensely violent saga of power and corruption.

Neo-Tokyo has risen from the ashes of World War III to become a dark and dangerous megalopolis infested with gangs and terrorists. The government seethes with corruption and only maintains a token control over the powerful military that prevents total chaos and hides the secrets of the past. Childhood friends Tetsuo and Kaneda plunge into Neo-Tokyo’s darkest secret when their motorcycle gang encounters a military operation to retrieve an escaped experimental subject. Tetsuo, captured by the military, is subjected to experiments that make him a powerful psychic, but, unfortunately for Neo-Tokyo, Tetsuo’s powers rage out of control and he lashes out at the world that has oppressed him! Nothing can stop the destructive forces that Tetsuo wields except possibly the last boy to destroy Tokyo.

Directed by Katsuhiro Otomo. Written by Katsuhiro Otomo and Izo Hashimoto. 124min. In Japanese with English subtitles. HD Digital.

Tickets for AKIRA available here (Thursday, 9/29)


Saturday, September 17, 2016

Paprika (2006) – 7:00pm (35mm) (at rush) / Show added Thurs. 9/22 @9:30pm

paprika-e

When a machine that allows therapists to enter their patients’ dreams is stolen, all hell breaks loose. Only a young female therapist can stop it: Paprika.

Paprika received a standing ovation at the Venice film festival. Christopher Nolan admitted the anime was used as inspiration for his film, Inception, but Kon’s film has far more fun with its dream worlds.

Co-written and directed by Satoshi Kon. 91 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. 35mm print.

Tickets for Paprika on Sunday 9/18 available here

Tickets for Paprika on Thursday 9/22 available here

Ghost in the Shell (1995) -9:00pm (at Rush) / Show added Mon. 9/19 @9:15pm

Ghost-in-the-Shell-Scarlett-Johansson

Sci-fi animation rarely rises to the heights reached here by the great Mamoru Oshii. One of the most effective cyberpunk narratives ever put on screen, GHOST IN THE SHELL follows the cyborg cop Motoko as she and her partner pursue a sinister hacker known as the Puppet Master both on- and offline. A stunning depiction of a digital future that seems closer all the time.

Directed by Mamoru Oshii. 83min. In Japanese with English subtitles. HD Digital.

Tickets for Ghost in the Shell on Saturday, 9/17 available here

Tickets for Ghost in the Shell on Monday, 9/19 available here


Sunday, September 18, 2016

Robot Carnival (1987) – 3:30pm

RC5

A unique collection of Japanese short animations by artists considered the rising stars of anime in the late 80s, this rare and wondrous compilation was a high-budget project centered around the themes of robots, electronic music and incredibly intricate artwork.

Robot Carnival is a cult classic and an overlooked piece of anime history that harkens back to an era of technical mastery and adventurous auteurism.

The Shorts:

In the Opening, directed by Katsuhiro Otomo (Akira) and Atsuko Fukushima (Genius Party), we are introduced to the titular Robot Carnival: a monstrous relic of the past terrorizing the denizens of an apocalyptic wasteland.

In Franken’s Gears, directed by Koji Morimoto (Mind Game), a mad scientist takes a page from Dr. Frankenstein in an attempt to create his own lightning-powered robot.

In Deprive, directed by Hidetoshi Omori (Inuyasha), a heroic robot battles evil aliens to protect his young charge in the style of an high-energy 80s action flick.

In Presence, directed by Yasuomi Umetsu (Kite), an inventor’s humanity is called into question by his own creation: a beautiful robot girl.

In Starlight Angel, directed by Hiroyuki Kitazume (Mobile Suit Gundam), a teenager has her heart broken in a robot-themed amusement park. But a new love might be waiting for her among the costumed characters and parades!

In Cloud, directed by Mao Lamdo (Metropolis), a child-like robot wanders a storybook earth in search of a way to become a real boy.

In A Tale of Two Robots, directed by Hiroyuki Kitakubo (Roujin Z), East meets West when two giant but very rustic robots comically feud in 19th century Japan.

In Nightmare, directed by Takashi Nakamura (Catnapped), Tokyo is invaded by machines in a Night on Bald Mountain-inspired sequence. The only one left standing in their way is a scooter-bound Ichabod Crane.

Finally, in the Epilogue, the story of the Robot Carnival concludes with a bang!

All the shorts are accompanied by a score from the talented Joe Hisaishi (Studio Ghibli).

Various directors. 91 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. Digital.

Tickets for Robot Carnival available here

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984) 5:30pm (at Rush)/ Show added Wed. 9/28 @9:15pm

nausicaa

Nausicaa is considered by many to be Hayao Miyazaki’s masterwork — and there are few films, animated or otherwise, of such sweeping scope and grandeur.

Set in a devastated future world decimated by atmospheric poisons and swarming with gigantic insects, Nausicaa is the story of a young princess, both brave and innocent, whose love for all living things and passionate determination to understand the processes of nature lead her into terrible danger, sacrifice, and eventual triumph. Like most Studio Ghibli films, there is neither good nor evil, but conflicting viewpoints, weaknesses, and power struggles. Throughout the film, Miyazaki’s animation is awe-inspiring; the depiction of the poisoned forest in particular is a thing of transcendent beauty.

Directed by Hayao Miyasaki. 118 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. DCP.

Tickets for Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind available here

Metropolis (2001) – 8:00pm (35mm)

metropolis_3

This mature work by veteran animator Rintaro cuts across anime and film history in its pedigree and references: based on a screenplay by Katsuhiro Otomo of Akira fame, it is also an adaptation of a 1949 manga comic by legendary cartoonist Osamu Tezuka’s, with debts as well to Fritz Lang’s classic 1927 dystopian urban epic of the same name.  A dazzlingly visualized futurist city is the backdrop for revolution and robot-human drama that recalls the preoccupations of Tezuka’s own canonical early anime work in Astro Boy.

Directed by Rintaro. Written by Katsuhiro Otomo. 113min. In Japanese with English subtitles. 35mm print.

Tickets for Metropolis available here

Want to see all SIX? Buy a festival pass for $60 to have access to all 6 films. Click here to buy your The Future was here Pass (if you get one, your pass will be held at the box office.)  PASSES ARE SOLD OUT.

FREE OR DISCOUNTED FOR ROXIE MEMBERS.