July 2014 – November 2015

July 15, 2014


Post Screening Q&A with Director Kerry Candaele!

“Thrilling…smartly assembled and gracefully paced.” — New York Times

“The film is beautiful and powerful…If millions could experience its affirming and incandescent message, we might turn around the destructive dynamics that are overwhelming the earth.”–Bill Moyers

“Each anecdote builds upon the next to create that rarest of films: a documentary as ineffable and transformative in its reach as it sets out to be.”–Village Voice

FOLLOWING THE NINTH tells the story of people whose lives have been transformed, repaired and healed by Beethoven’s Ninth message: Alle Menschen werden Bruder (All People Are Brothers) Director Kerry Candaele follows the artistic, cultural, and political impact of the Ninth across five continents and ten countries, from Tiananmen Square to the Berlin Wall to the prisons of Pinochet’s Chile and the townships of South Africa, tracing the ways in which its grand, soaring melody and inspiring words of peace, tolerance, and love have sustained hope in a manner that few works of art have ever achieved. Dir: Kerry Candaele – 2013 – 85 Minutes

July 20, 2014

Windy Day Em Resize


Sunday, July 20

Q&A WITH NOTED ANIMATOR – AND DAUGHTER OF JOHN AND FAITH – EMILY HUBLEY AFTER THE 6PM SHOW! A traveling program of films by animators John and Faith Hubley, all in new 35mm prints, celebrating John Hubley’s 100th birthday.

ADVENTURES OF AN *  – A baby, represented by the “ * ” symbol, delights in the visual excitement of the world. As he matures, his ability to see diminishes. Eventually, his own child freshens his vision.  Produced and Written by John and Faith Hubley in collaboration with James Johnson Sweeney.  Dir: John Hubley. 1956, 11 mins.

TENDER GAME  – A jazz version of the song “Tenderly,” provides the soundtrack for a delicate tale of love.  Produced and Written by John Hubley  Music Performed by Ella Fitzgerald and the Oscar Peterson Trio: Ray Brown, bass and Herb Ellis, guitar.  1958, 6 mins.

MOONBIRD – In a magical adventure, two brothers hunt an imaginary bird. Their dialogue is improvised.  Produced and Written by John and Faith Hubley.  Voices of Mark and Ray Hubley.  Dir: John Hubley.  1959.  10 mins. 

THE HAT  – Two soldiers patrol the border between their counties. When one accidentally drops his helmet over the line, the other refuses to give it back – setting the scene for a witty exploration of peace through world law.  Music and Voices by Dizzy Gillespie and Dudley Moore.  Produced and Written by John and Faith Hubley for The World Law Fund.  Dir: John Hubley.  1964.  19 mins.

URBANISSIMO – A comic allegory depicting a runaway “city” devouring its environs. A farmer has an encounter with the “city” and deserts his rural home for the imagined joys of urban life.  Produced by John and Faith Hubley for Expo ’67, Montreal.  Music by Benny Carter.  Dir: John Hubley.  1967. 6 mins.

WINDY DAY – An improvised dialogue of two little girls is the background for the expressive visualization of their view of marriage and babies, love and death.  Voices of Emily and Georgia Hubley.  Produced and Directed by John and Faith Hubley.  1968. 9 mins.

OF MEN AND DEMONS – A simple fisherman faces the challenges posed by climate and modernity as personified by three resourceful demons.  Music by Quincy Jones  Produced and Directed by John and Faith Hubley.  1968. 9 mins.

EGGS – Mother Nature bickers with Death over control of humankind before a fateful decision is made.  Music by Quincy Jones.  Voices of David Burns, Anita Ellis, and Grady Tate.  Produced and Written by John and Faith Hubley
Dir: John Hubley.  1970.  10 mins.


The Hat Web Resize


Organized in collaboration with the Hubley family, Cinema Conservancy’s centennial tour coincides with The Believer Magazine’s 2014 Film Issue. The issue will feature a DVD with a number of the Hubleys’ films, including “Cockaboody” (1973), “The Hole” (1963), and “Date With Dizzy” (1958), as well as commercials, home movies and storyboards.

Visually striking, playful and innovative, the selected films address a wide range of topics – from urbanization and overpopulation to two boys’ search for a pet bird – and feature the voices of Dizzy Gillespie, Dudley Moore, and the Hubleys’ children (Emily, Georgia, Mark and Ray), as well as music from Benny Carter, The Oscar Peterson Trio and Quincy Jones.

John Hubley began his training at Disney (where his participation in the studio’s famous 1941 strike caused him and other animators to be fired and later blacklisted) and went on to the Army’s Motion Picture Unit and UPA. The personal and creative partnership between John and Faith (Elliott) Hubley lasted from the 1950’s until John’s death in 1977. True to their marriage vow to finish one independent film per year, the Hubleys created over 20 animated films together, winning three Academy Awards (for “Moonbird,” “The Hole,” and 1966’s “Herb Alpert and The Tijuana Brass Double Feature”), in addition to taking on ads, commissions and segments for TV shows such as Sesame Street and The Electric Company. Faith Hubley went on to make 23 more films after 1977.

Breaking new artistic ground and exploring urgent topics in their films, the Hubleys rebelled, as John told animation historian John Canemaker, “against the sweet sentimental chipmunk and bunnies idiom of animation.” They favored a modern aesthetic, using techniques such as wax-resistance, oil painting and bottom-lit watercolors. In their experimentations with improvised dialogue and music, the pair found inspiration everywhere, from conversations between New York construction workers to the musings of their own children. Cinema Conservancy is thrilled to be bringing the Hubley’s work back to theaters in 2014.

ADVENTURES OF AN *, THE TENDER GAME, and URBANISSIMO were preserved by The Museum of Modern Art with support from the Celeste Bartos Fund for Film Preservation.


A CINEMA CONSERVANCY RELEASE.  TOTAL PROGRAM RUNNING TIME: 80 mins.  35mm.  Shows Sunday, July 20 at (2pm), 4pm, 6pm & 8pm.

 Read the IndieWire piece on the series here!



November 27, 2015 - December 3, 2015

Rififi1Du Rififi chez les hommes (1955)


Fri, Nov. 27 – Thurs, Dec 3

 Back from the pen, homme dur Jean Servais first belts around his ex-girlfriend Marie Sabouret, then rejoins copain Carl Möhner and cohort Robert Manuel, who’ve got a little jewel store smash-and-grab job lined up — but Servais wants the whole works. With the aid of freshly imported safecracker “César the Milanese” (director Dassin billed as “Perlo Vita”), the resulting classic heist — a legendary 30-minute sequence with no dialogue or music — provided a usable blueprint for real-life professionals (causing outright bans in some countries) — but then, another of Sabouret’s ex-boyfriends wants a big cut. A world-wide smash, Rififi raised eyebrows for its excessive gunplay, décolletage, and dope use — all of which led to its condemnation by the American Legion of Decency. Blacklisted Hollywood exile Dassin turned a Rififi2potboiler by milieu specialist Auguste Le Breton into an existential thriller that earned him Cannes’ Best Director prize and set the standard for screen robberies for decades to come — from his own Topkapi to Mission: Impossible — while “Rififi” was subsequently stolen for titles of non-related thrillers. Philippe Agostini’s all-weather location shooting provides an invaluable time capsule of Paris in the 50s, with the late Magali Noël warbling the title song. Approx. 118 mins. DCP.

“THE BEST OF ALL HEIST MOVIES! Rififi mirrors the arcs of the criminal lives it examines: It seduces you in, and then won’t let you out cleanly. THIS IS TOUGH-GUY NOIR OF THE HIGHEST PROOF.” 
– Alan Scherstuhl, Village Voice 
Read full review here


Rfifi7“THE UNFORGETTABLE MASTERPIECE OF CRIME… Dassin’s meditative magnum opus. A MUST-SEE.” 
– Indiewire’s The Playlist

– Andrew Sarris


– Francois Truffaut

“The underworld equivalent of a sublime French meal… As Rififi goes on, it becomes as savage as Reservoir Dogs, The Killing, or any of the other dozens of films over which it still casts a shadow.”
– Owen Gleiberman, Entertainment Weekly

Rififi6“JUST ABOUT FLAWLESS! For lovers of tough-guy moviemaking, Rififi really means perfection. A genre movie brought off so keenly that it defines that genre’s strengths and limits… As a director, Mr. Dassin has perfect pitch. When anything disrupts the film’s dry yet convivial tone — like Tony beating his ex-lover for taking up with that nightclub owner in his absence — it registers as a troubling portent, not a dramatic miscue. The movie has been criticized for its astringency: no spontaneous emotion, no tender or playful impulse, goes unpunished. But that’s what gives the film its hardscrabble integrity. Mr. Dassin seduces you into thinking that you’re joining four underworld musketeers. Then he shows you there’s no room in this band for carefree camaraderie.”
– Michael Sragow, The New York Times