Calendar

Mar
10
Tue
Nippon Nights #7: Branded to Kill by Seijun Suzuki
March 10, 2015

“Reputedly one of Seijun Suzuki’s finest works and unquestionably very stylish in its ‘Scope framings (Jim Jarmusch copied a few shots from it in his Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai)”

-Jonathan Rosenbaum,  Chicago Reader

Unknown-5A hit-man, with a fetish for sniffing boiling rice, fumbles his latest job, putting him into conflict with his treacherous wife, with a mysterious woman eager for death and with the phantom-like hit-man known only as Number One.

Directed by Seijun Suzuki, 91min, 1967, Japan

Branded to Kill review – genuinely bizarre Japanese thriller

Seijun Suzuki’s Branded to Kill is a very 1960s metaphysical thriller, a cult item treasured by connoisseurs as the kind of film that – for all its delirious craziness – could even be a truer product of Japan than the higher artefacts of Ozu and Kurosawa. It is an erotic and dreamlike pulp noir, and its disdain for any sort of conventional plot infuriated the director’s employers at the Nikkatsu studio. Jô Shishido is Hanada, a hired killer with a sexual fetish for the smell of boiled rice; a bungled job brings him into mysterious contact with Misako (Anne Mari), a woman who hires him for three hits. He becomes obsessed with her, and finds himself in a duel with the legendary top killer, the No 1 (Kôji Nanbara). The obvious comparisons are with Melville’s Le Samouraï or Godard’s Pierrot le Fou – this film holds up against these perfectly well – with hints of John Boorman’s Point Blank and Patrick McGoohan’s The Prisoner. It is, however, closer to Luis Buñuel in its gleefully disquieting insistence on sudden horrific closeups: the glass eye removed from the skull, the bullet hole, the bleeding head in the toilet bowl. Where Godard had his jump-cut, Suzuki has his disorientating ellipses, his sudden dreamlike time-slips. Genuinely fascinating and bizarre.

Peter Bradshaw, The Gurdian

Apr
10
Fri
Invasion of the Body Snatchers double feature
April 10, 2015

Spoke Art and Trailers from Hell present:

Invasion of the Body Snatchers double feature

with special guests Philip Kaufman (director –  Invasion ’78) and Sam Hamm (writer – Batman)

Unknowninvasion-body-snatchers

Join us Friday, April 10th for a very special double feature of both the 1956 and 1978 versions of the cult sci-fi classic, Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

As an added bonus, the director of the 1978 version, Philip Kaufman, will join acclaimed screenwriter Sam Hamm (Batman, Batman Returns) on stage for a very special Q&A session.

Spoke Art gallery will also present a brand new limited edition screen print to commemorate this once in a lifetime event.

1956: Directed by Don Siegel, 80min.

A small-town doctor learns that the population of his community is being replaced by emotionless alien duplicates.

1978: Directed by Philip Kaufman, 115min.

In San Francisco, a group of people discover the human race is being replaced one by one, with clones devoid of emotion.

Apr
16
Thu
Nippon Nights #8: GHOST IN THE SHELL
April 16, 2015

Ghost in the Shell stands as one of the pioneering films of anime history, one that captures the imagination with its intricate story and dazzles the eyes with its gorgeous animation.

-Jeff Beck, Examiner.com

MovieClipping (53)The year is 2034 and the face of terrorism has changed. No longer restricted to the limits of the physical world, the war on terror has exploded onto the net. In an attempt to confront this new threat, an elite counter-terrorism and anti-crime unit was formed: Public Security Section 9.

2ebc1db3-e9e4-4788-9062-a50cf46c4cc5-1020x612Two years have since passed when the team’s commander: Major Motoko Kusanagi, resigned from her post. After a rash of mysterious suicides Section 9 is forced to confront the ‘Puppeteer,’ a dangerous hacker with unsurpassed skills.

imagesAs their investigation of this terrorist threat takes them deeper into the bowels of a potential government conspiracy, Section 9 once again crosses paths with the Major, but is her sudden reappearance more than a coincidence, or is she somehow connected to the ‘Puppeteer’?

No one is above suspicion in this action-packed continuation of Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex saga!

Directed by Mamoru Oshii, 83min., 1995, Japan, English subtitled.