Calendar

February – March 2015

Feb
7
Sat
SF Indie Fest: Shorts 1: Personals
February 7, 2015 - February 9, 2015

BigGirl Shorts 1Human seeking other human for some semblance of connection, validity of existence, warmth. Me: your daughter’s funeral crasher; your son’s first love; your new husband’s estranged brother. You: a brave one, forced to grow up too soon; a loved one, who still has time on this earth; a mysterious one, who showed up on my couch this morning. I know you’re out there. Meet me at the Roxie. -JW

Included Shorts

Big Girl (16min) More

Helberger In Paradise (17min) More

Keep the Change (16min) More

Person to Person (18min) More

This Is Not The End (6min) More

Wedding Dress (13min) More

Presented by KQED’s “Film School Shorts”

Feb
8
Sun
SF Indie Fest: Shorts 2: No Regrets
February 8, 2015 - February 10, 2015

Fantastic shorts 2This shorts block, featuring new work from Indiefest alum and newcomers alike, will make you feel funny. Sometimes funny-ha-ha, sometimes funny-but-please-stop, and sometimes just hungry. But we guarantee this: You won’t leave without seeing something unlike anything you’ve seen before. (And we promise that’s not code for a bunch of impenetrable experimental art pieces.) Be mesmerized by Juggalos, eavesdrop on an uncomfortable assassination plot, and get the most difficult-to-say last name stuck in your head for days. -JW

Included Shorts

Bad at Dancing (10min) More

Buffalo Juggalos (30min) More

Fantastic (21min) More

Queso Flameado (7min) More

Smithston (9min) More

Total Freak (9min) More

Presented by KQED’s “Film School Shorts”

Feb
15
Sun
SF Indie Fest: FILM SCHOOL GEMS
February 15, 2015 - February 16, 2015

film school gems 2Film School Shorts is KQED’s national showcase of the best short fiction films from across the country that feature everything from quirky comedies to slice-of-life dramas to hard-hitting thrillers from major institutions like NYU, Columbia University and CalArts that have wowed audiences at Cannes, Sundance, Toronto, Telluride and SXSW.  The short films included here are highlights from the show’s upcoming Season 3 and represent a wide-range of styles and content and introduce vibrant, young filmmakers that are soon to make an impact in the industry. – CM – Presented by KQED’s Film School Shorts

Mar
10
Tue
Nippon Nights #7: Branded to Kill by Seijun Suzuki
March 10, 2015

“Reputedly one of Seijun Suzuki’s finest works and unquestionably very stylish in its ‘Scope framings (Jim Jarmusch copied a few shots from it in his Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai)”

-Jonathan Rosenbaum,  Chicago Reader

Unknown-5A hit-man, with a fetish for sniffing boiling rice, fumbles his latest job, putting him into conflict with his treacherous wife, with a mysterious woman eager for death and with the phantom-like hit-man known only as Number One.

Directed by Seijun Suzuki, 91min, 1967, Japan

Branded to Kill review – genuinely bizarre Japanese thriller

Seijun Suzuki’s Branded to Kill is a very 1960s metaphysical thriller, a cult item treasured by connoisseurs as the kind of film that – for all its delirious craziness – could even be a truer product of Japan than the higher artefacts of Ozu and Kurosawa. It is an erotic and dreamlike pulp noir, and its disdain for any sort of conventional plot infuriated the director’s employers at the Nikkatsu studio. Jô Shishido is Hanada, a hired killer with a sexual fetish for the smell of boiled rice; a bungled job brings him into mysterious contact with Misako (Anne Mari), a woman who hires him for three hits. He becomes obsessed with her, and finds himself in a duel with the legendary top killer, the No 1 (Kôji Nanbara). The obvious comparisons are with Melville’s Le Samouraï or Godard’s Pierrot le Fou – this film holds up against these perfectly well – with hints of John Boorman’s Point Blank and Patrick McGoohan’s The Prisoner. It is, however, closer to Luis Buñuel in its gleefully disquieting insistence on sudden horrific closeups: the glass eye removed from the skull, the bullet hole, the bleeding head in the toilet bowl. Where Godard had his jump-cut, Suzuki has his disorientating ellipses, his sudden dreamlike time-slips. Genuinely fascinating and bizarre.

Peter Bradshaw, The Gurdian