Archive for ""

K8 Hardy’s OUTFITUMENTARY

When:
April 25, 2018 @ 12:00 am – 11:45 pm
Tags:

Presented by San Francisco Cinematheque. Co-presented by the Roxie and Frameline.

I discovered video art through punk rock and riot Grrrl, and through artists and bands that were making videos in that scene. Video was the easiest way for me to make my own statement, to represent myself as a young angry woman, and to get the work out there. I had previously been making small zines and mailing them all over the states. I had a drive to tell my own story. Outfitumentary was a step beyond. Video was also a way for me to express my queer identity and articulate my thoughts of gender as performance. I was connecting the sexual politics with the experiential. And I was connecting an experimental process with queer politics. This is a Gesamtkunstwerk.

— K8 Hardy

For ten years, beginning in 2001, artist and filmmaker K8 Hardy documented her daily outfits on video according to a very simple set of self-imposed rules. Over an eleven-year period, until the camera broke, she captured these outfits—and outfitting—on a fairly consistent, if not daily basis, using the same “shitty” mini-DV camera, filming in an ever-changing series living spaces and art studios in New York. The result of this disciplined process is the fascinating Outfitumentary (2016), a thrilling evolutionary document of life and living, fashion and persona in 21st Century New York; an episodic first-person account of a young, lesbian feminist dressed and styled in her “coming of age;” and an examination of coded fashion statements and subcultural communication in the pre-instagram era.

I named the project at the outset, and considered it a document for posterity, an important record of the dress codes of a radical lesbian underground. The film expresses a fundamental principle running through my work and practice—the ways in which the body becomes its own medium. [Outfitumentary is about identity, and the way in which both the materiality of the body and its subsequent “outfitting” serves to refine, define and probe the very nature of the body politic.” (K8 Hardy)

Directed by K8 Hardy. 2016. USA. 82 min. DCP.

FREE OR DISCOUNTED FOR MEMBERS

2018 Oscar Nominated Animated Shorts

When:
March 2, 2018 @ 12:00 am – March 4, 2018 @ 11:45 pm
Categories:
Tags:

The annual popular program provides both the delight of discovery and renewed wonder at the ways in which animated cinema can explore the world through fresh points of view and unbridled curiosity. As in previous years, the 2018 Oscar® Short Animations program will present all five nominees in one spectacular presentation, along with additional screenings of some highly commended animated shorts that didn’t make the cut. Make your picks and see the winners announced at our annual UP THE AWARDS BENEFIT BASH on March 4th.  If past years are any measure, advance ticket purchase is strongly recommended! Total Run Time: 84 minutes 

 

OSCAR NOMINATED ANIMATED SHORTS

DEAR BASKETBALL 

Basketball great Kobe Bryant collaborated with visionary animator Glen Keane and legendary composer John Williams on an animated short film that explores what it means to achieve your dream, and then leave it behind. The animated film is an adaptation of Bryant’s NBA retirement announcement after 20 years with the Los Angeles Lakers. Narrated by Bryant, the film’s hand-drawn animation and emotional score will touch fans of all ages with its universal message about love and loss.

Directed by Glen Keane. 5 minutes. United States. 2017.

 

LOU 

When a toy stealing bully ruins recess for a playground full of kids, only one thing stands in his way: the “Lost and Found” box.

Directed by Dave Mullins and Dana Leigh Murray. 7 minutes. United States. 2017.

 

NEGATIVE SPACE

My dad taught me how to pack.

Directed by Ru Kuwahata and Max Porter. 6 minutes. France. 2017.

 

 

REVOLTING RHYMES

REVOLTING RHYMES interweaves Dahl’s retellings of classic fairy tales with playful twists and surprising endings. The all-star voice cast comprises of Dominic West, David Walliams, Rob Brydon, Tamsin Greig, Bertie Carvel, Rose Leslie, Bel Powley, Gemma Chan and Isaac Hempstead Wright. Based on the book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake, REVOLTING RHYMES was directed by Oscar nominees Jakob Schuh (“THE GRUFFALO”) and Jan Lachauer (“ROOM ON THE BROOM”), co-directed by Bin-Han To and produced by Magic Light Pictures’ Martin Pope and Michael Rose (“THE GRUFFALO,” “ROOM ON THE BROOM,” “CHICO” and “RITA”). The animation was created at Magic Light’s Berlin studio and at Triggerfish Animation Studios in Cape Town.

Directed by Jakob Schuh and Jan Lachauer. 29 minutes. United Kingdom. 2016.

 

GARDEN PARTY

In a deserted rich house, a couple of amphibians explore their surroundings and follow their primal instincts.

Directed by Gabriel Grapperon and Victor Claire. 7 minutes. France. 2016.

 

HIGHLY COMMENDED ANIMATED SHORTS

ACHOO

In ancient China, a little dragon who can’t breathe fire will fight to overcome his weakness in order to take part in the New Year’s celebration.

A short film by Lucas Boutrot, Elise Carret, Maaris Creantor, Pierre Hubert, Camille Lacroix, and Charlotte Perroux. 7 minutes. France. 2017.

LOST PROPERTY

When you lose something dear to your heart, there is only one place it can be found. The Lost Property Office.

Directed by Asa Lucander. 6 minutes. United Kingdom. 2016.

 

WEEDS

WEEDS tells the story of a dandelion, rooted on the wrong side of the driveway in a barren yard surrounded by dry dirt and dead grass. Just across the concrete lies another yard, where the sprinklers spray water endlessly, and the greener grass holds the promise of a better life. While watching helplessly as its fellow weeds wither away and die, the dandelion faces a decision: take action or suffer the same fate.

Directed by Kevin Hudson. 3 minutes. United States. 2017.

 

FREE OR DISCOUNTED FOR MEMBERS

MODERN LIFE IS RUBBISH

When:
April 27, 2018 @ 12:00 am – May 3, 2018 @ 11:45 pm
Tags:

 

First brought together by their shared love of music, ten years later Liam and Natalie have reached a breaking point. Opposites attract, but aren’t necessarily working long-term. Liam, a struggling musician, cannot let go of his vinyl collection and refuses to adapt to a world of smartphones and instant downloads. Natalie has let go of her dream of designing album covers and has become a rising star at her advertising firm. As they make the difficult decision to separate, they start by splitting their prized music library, but the soundtrack that defined their relationship keeps pulling them back together.

 

Starring Freya Mavor, Josh Whitehouse, Ian Hart, Jessie Cave, and Matt Milne. Directed by Daniel Jerome Gill, UK, 2017. 105 min. Digital.

 

TICKETS COMING SOON!

THE SHAPE OF WATER + CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON (35mm)

When:
March 10, 2018 @ 12:00 am – 1:00 am
Categories:
Tags:

“I’ve had this movie (THE SHAPE OF WATER) in my head since I was 6, not as a story but as an idea… When I saw the creature swimming under Julie Adams [in CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON], I thought three things: I thought, ‘Hubba-hubba.’ I thought, ‘This is the most poetic thing I’ll ever see.’ I was overwhelmed by the beauty. And the third thing I thought is, ‘I hope they end up together.’” – Guillermo del Toro


THE SHAPE OF WATER 6:45pm

Nominated to 13 Academy Award Nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director (Guillermo del Toro), Best Actress (Sally Hawkins), Best Original Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor (Richard Jenkins) and Best Supporting Actress (Octavia Spencer).

This otherworldly fable from master story teller Guillermo del Toro is set against the backdrop of Cold War America circa 1962. In the hidden high-security government laboratory where she works, lonely Elisa (Sally Hawkins) is trapped in a life of isolation. Elisa’s life is changed forever when she and co-worker Zelda (Octavia Spencer) discover a secret classified experiment. Rounding out the cast are Michael Shannon, Richard Jenkins, Michael Stuhlbarg and Doug Jones.

2017, Fox Searchlight, 123 min, Canada/USA, Dir: Guillermo del Toro. DCP.


CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON 9pm

Ichthyologist Dr. David Reed (Richard Carlson) leads a team of scientists on an expedition up the Amazon River to hunt for fossils linking prehistoric land and sea mammals. But the murky waters of the region’s Black Lagoon hide more than old bones; an amphibious gill-man rises from the depths to attack the researchers. Like King Kong, the creature is captured, escapes and sets his sights on a beautiful woman – Dr. Reed’s girlfriend, Kay (Julia Adams). The last of the classic Universal movie monsters, CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON  remains among the most memorable horror films of the 1950s.

1954, Universal, 79 min, USA, Dir: Jack Arnold. 35mm.

 

Keep the Change

When:
March 23, 2018 @ 12:01 am – March 29, 2018 @ 11:45 pm

2017 Tribeca Film Festival Best Narrative Feature and Best New Narrative Director

“Charming, romantic. It’s an ode to self-discovery and acceptance that’s as funny as it is sweet.” – Variety

A 2017 SF Jewish Film Festival fan favorite!

When aspiring filmmaker David (Brandon Polansky) is mandated by a judge to attend a social program at the Jewish Community Center, he is sure of one thing: he doesn’t belong there. But when he’s assigned to visit the Brooklyn Bridge with the vivacious Sarah (Samantha Elisofon), sparks fly and his convictions are tested. Their budding relationship must weather Sarah’s romantic past, David’s judgmental mother (Jessica Walter), and their own pre-conceptions of what love is supposed to look like.

Under the guise of an off-kilter New York romantic comedy, Keep the Change does something quite radical in offering a refreshingly honest portrait of a community seldom depicted on the big screen. Rarely has a romcom felt so deep and poignant. Thoroughly charming and quite funny, the film’s warmth and candor brings growth and transformation to the characters, and ultimately, to us.

“Positions itself to join the pantheon of New York rom-coms. Refreshingly uncynical. We’ve seen the Brooklyn Bridge up there on the big screen plenty of times, but rarely have we seen it crossed by characters quite like these.” -Indiewire

MIND GAME

When:
March 16, 2018 @ 12:00 am – March 22, 2018 @ 11:45 pm
Tags:

Buckle in and prepare to surrender yourself to an exhilarating and wildly entertaining ride. Cult classic Mind Game is an explosion of unconstrained expression – gloriously colorful mages ricochet in rapid fire associations,like Masaaki Yuasa’s brain splattered onto the screen in all its goopy glory. Audiences will begin to grasp what they are in for early on as loser Nishi, too wimpy to try to save his childhood sweetheart from gangsters, is shot in  the butt by a soccer-playing psychopath, projecting Nishi into the afterlife. In this limbo, God – shown as a series of rapidly changing characters – tells him to walk toward the light.  But Nishi runs like hell in the other direction and returns to Earth a changed man, driven to live each moment to the fullest.

The film’s title says it all — this is a head trip like no other. Combining a wide array of techniques from traditional hand-drawn animation to rotoscoping to collage, Yuasa creates a genre-bending adventure that cannot be described, only experienced. Though its circulation has been limited outside of Japan, the film has developed a passionate cult following, making this perfect for both anime and midnight audiences alike. 

Directed by  Masaaki Yuasa. 104 minutes. Japan. 2004. DCP.

FREE OR DISCOUNTED FOR MEMBERS

More showtimes will be added soon. Stay tuned!

THE OUTHOUSE THE FILM 1985 – 1997

When:
March 29, 2018 @ 12:01 am – 11:15 pm
Tags:

“Punk rock was a rally cry for a generation to create a rip in the stereotypical normal.” -Patron; The Outhouse

In the mid-1980s outside this college town, home of the Kansas Jayhawks, punk rock history was being made in the middle of a cornfield. Where the pavement turned to gravel, in a small, primitive cinder block building, bands like Fugazi, the Melvins, Rollins Band, Gwar, the Circle Jerks, Body Count, Social Distortion, Bad Brains, White Zombie, Descendents, Sonic Youth, Green Day, Fishbone, the Meat Puppets, Helmet and Nirvana played to all-ages crowds, a raucous scene of misfits and anarchists on the margins of youth culture.  William Burroughs, who lived in Lawrence, became part of the scene, coming out during the day to make art and shoot his shotguns.  This was The Outhouse. Small, dark and sometimes dangerous, it quickly gained a reputation as a haven for the bands other venues were afraid of, and the kids who loved them.

“The Outhouse” tells the story of this legendary, lawless punk venue (1985-1997) in the voices of the musicians, the fans, the promoters, the local sheriff and the pissed-off neighbors. Independent filmmaker Brad Norman, an Outhouse regular who later booked bands there, spent five years tracking down amateur footage, grainy photos and show flyers, and interviewing regulars and musicians, including Ice T, Henry Rollins, Fugazi’s Ian MacKaye and Gwar frontman Dave Brockie. “It’s been thirty years, but when you ask people about The Outhouse, they can remember it clearly,” Norman says, ”It was amazing.” The film, which premieres in October, is an unflinching snapshot of a place and time, during alternative music’s heyday, before it went mainstream.

“At The Outhouse, you’d see kids with mohawks and kids with mullets. Straight-edged teens and skinheads, and before Nirvana broke, punk rock was not a type of music. There wasn’t a punk sound. No one could put their finger on it, and say they’re playing ‘punk rock.’ Punk bands were called punk bands because the people in them were punks. The Bad Brains didn’t sound like the Dead Kennedys, and so on. They were all ‘punks.’ They were free thinkers. They were creative. They did what they wanted. Define punk? It’s like freedom. It’s like truth.” -Brad Norman, Director

Directed by Brad Norman. 2017. USA. Total Run Time: 120.

 

THIS FILM IS FREE OR DISCOUNTED FOR MEMBERS

Staff Pick: OVERLORD (35mm)

When:
March 28, 2018 @ 12:00 am – 11:45 pm
Categories:
Tags:

LEAD PROJECTIONIST CARL’S PICK!

“The only thing wrong with OVERLORD is it’s too short.”Stanley Kubrick

In the early ’70s, director Stuart Cooper was granted unlimited access to the Imperial War Museum‘s vast trove of Second World War footage shot by British and German soldiers, a pristine and still mostly unseen testament to the destructive–and creative–power of mobilized humanity.  Around this material he constructed what is surely the most intimate, and most real, WWII narrative film ever made.  With lighting and period lenses, master cinematographer John Alcott (Barry Lyndon) matched the visual texture of the historical footage and, as in It Happened Here a decade before, authentic costumes and artillery contribute to the film’s uncanny period-immersion.  You will see things you have never seen before, and they will amaze you.  
 
Winner, Silver Bear Jury Prize, 1975 Berlin Film Festival

“OVERLORD, a prize-winning entry in the 1975 Berlin Film Festival, deserves to join the pantheon of essential World War II combat movies.” -A.O. Scott, NY Times

Directed by Stuart Cooper. 84 minutes. United Kingdom. 1975. 35mm.

FREE OR DISCOUNTED FOR MEMBERS

24 FRAMES

When:
March 16, 2018 @ 12:00 am – March 22, 2018 @ 11:45 pm
Tags:

A Q&A with producer Ahmad Kiarostami will follow the 6:30pm screening on Saturday, March 17, moderated by Jonathan Marlow (Arbelos / CFI Releasing / Paracme)

“24 Frames immediately communicates the power of the theater experience, in the way that so many of Kiarostami’s movies can.” -David Sims, The Atlantic

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated them into subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignettes, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami. 114 minutes. Iran & France. 2017. A Janus Films release.

FREE OR DISCOUNTED FOR MEMBERS

More shows will be added soon!

The Dark Side of the Dream

THE DARK SIDE OF THE DREAM

When:
March 23, 2018 @ 12:00 am – March 26, 2018 @ 11:45 pm
Tags:

FRIDAY, MARCH 23 – MONDAY, MARCH 26

The Dark Side of the Dream

THE DARK SIDE OF THE DREAM

Subversive cinema… for subversive times 1933-1964

Elliot Lavine returns to the Roxie!

What more do you need to know? Bay Area legend Elliot Lavine brings his I WAKE UP DREAMING mojo back to the Roxie with a hard-hitting series that takes a sharp look at the dark side of the American Dream. Six indelible double-bills hand-picked by Elliot (with input from Midcentury Productions’ maestro Don Malcolm…) to thrill and chill, excite and edify. Schedule details below. Festival pass is just $50 for 12 films—buy and save!

Friday, March 23

Try and Get Me! and Black Legion

TRY AND GET ME!  7:00

Frank Lovejoy goes bowling, meets Lloyd Bridges, and dark destiny takes over. Cy Endfield’s astonishing, incendiary look at the post-WWII American malaise builds to an unthinkable climax.  (1951, Cy Endfield)

BLACK LEGION  9:00

Sowing the seeds of hate—more than a quaint American pastime! See Humphrey Bogart in an early (1937) role as a man duped into joining a sinister organization with Un-American aims!  (1937, Archie Mayo)

Saturday Matinée, March 24

The Lawless - M

THE LAWLESS  2:00

Our tribute to Joseph Losey’s “social outcry” period begins with this tale of racial tension in a small town that boils over into mob violence thanks to yellow journalism. A lost Losey gem!  (1950, Joseph Losey)

M  3:45

Losey remakes Fritz Lang’s classic & fashions a nightmarish American version featuring an astonishing cast-against-type performance from David Wayne, complete with bravura sequences at Los Angeles’ iconic Bradbury Building!  (1951, Joseph Losey)

Saturday Evening, March 24

The Naked Kiss - Marked Woman

THE NAKED KISS  7:00

Constance Towers is…well, towering as a woman trying to rebuild her life after working as a prostitute. Director Sam Fuller pulls out all the stops in an amazing tale of pulp feminism!  (1964, Samuel Fuller)

MARKED WOMAN  9:00

Bette Davis tries to put the pimps out of business, and is nearly put out of business herself—for good! This is the film where Davis finds the steely edge that informs all of her future work! She’s ably supported by Humphrey Bogart, cast against type as a crusading DA. (1937, Lloyd Bacon)

Sunday Matinée, March 25

Heroes for Sale - They Won't Forget

HEROES FOR SALE  1:30

Richard Barthelmess discovers that America is more than a tough place for a war veteran—it’s an out-and-out racket! Legendary director William Wellman spills out all the setbacks and contradictions, but leaves room for hope (embodied by Loretta Young). One of the greatest but least-known pre-Code classics!  (1933, William Wellman)

THEY WON’T FORGET  3:15

Sweater girl Lana Turner is murdered—and it sets off a manhunt that leads to a false arrest, and a show trial of epic proportions. Claude Rains gives his first great performance as the unscrupulous DA ready to leapfrog justice in pursuit of political gain.  (1937, Mervyn LeRoy)

Sunday Evening, March 25

A Face in the Crowd - Meet John Doe

A FACE IN THE CROWD  6:00

Delusions of grandeur, American style—cornpone division. Andy Griffith burns up the screen as media-made monster Lonesome Rhodes, who gives his “handlers” the slip and charts a course for the sun as America’s first media-made Icarus. A still-startling cautionary tale from the embattled Elia Kazan.  (1957, Elia Kazan)

MEET JOHN DOE  8:30

Cynicism and idealism trade blows for a full fifteen rounds in Frank Capra’s tale of an impostor (Gary Cooper) turned into a folk hero by the head of a political cartel (Edward Arnold) for nefarious purposes. Can the jaded reporter (Barbara Stanwyck) find a way to undo the damage she set into motion? And what about the “little punks,” anyway? (1941, Frank Capra)

Monday, March 26

Body and Soul - We Were Strangers

BODY AND SOUL 7:00

The great John Garfield proves he can take a punch in this startling exposé of the boxing business—trying to stay clean in a dirty business while trying to choose between two women who embody opposite corners in the fight to know what “love is all about.” Riveting and unforgettable!  (1947, Robert Rossen)

WE WERE STRANGERS  9:15

John Huston made this little-known film between The Treasure of Sierra Madre and The Asphalt Jungle—and it might well be his most mature reflection on politics. Set in 1930s Cuba, the film depicts the desperate dedication of revolutionaries (Garfield and a superbly simmering Jennifer Jones) who dodge a menacing enforcer (a great performance from Mexican actor Pedro Armendáriz) in order to bring down a corrupt dictator. Featuring sensational chiaroscuro photography from Russell Metty.

FESTIVAL PASS  Just $50 — wake up to a dream come true with Elliot Lavine and 12 astounding films. BUY HERE